Tag Archives: thinkthin bar

Think Before You Choose the thinkThin® Protein Bar

If you think a thinkThin Bar is a healthy snack, because it’s:

  • high protein
  • sugar-free
  • gluten-free

… think again.

Check out the ingredients (the most objectionable ingredients are bold): Protein blend (calcium caseinate, soy protein isolate, whey protein isolate), glycerin, coating (maltitol, cocoa butter, chocolate liquor, sodium caseinate, dairy oil, soya lecithin, natural flavors, salt), glycerin, maltitol syrup, ground peanuts, soy crisps (soy protein isolate, rice flour, calcium carbonate), water, peanuts, canola oil, peanut flour, natural flavors, tricalcium phosphate, soya lecithin, salt. Vitamins and Minerals: ascorbic acid, d-alpha tocopherol, niacinamide, zinc oxide, vitamin A palmitate, electrolytic iron, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, copper gluconate, riboflavin, thiamin mononitrate, folic acid, biotin, potassium iodide, vitamin B12.

Here’s the lowdown:

  1. Soy is the main protein source. Read my post about the dangers of soy. Most protein bars have soy as the main protein source; this is not good by any measure. Consider eating real food instead.
  2. Glycerin is not food.
  3. Maltitol syrup, like high-fructose corn syrup, is a processed syrup that has the same number on the glycemic index as sugar (about 60), but the body can’t process it as efficiently.
  4. There is no nutritional or culinary reason to use cheap, refined canola oil. Many other fats are superior: coconut oil, ghee, butter, olive oil …
  5. Folic acid is popular for enriching industrial foods; too much folic acid from enriched foods can mask a vitamin B-12 deficiency. You cannot get too much folic acid from food that naturally contains it (such as leafy vegetables, citrus, beans), but avoid food “enriched” with folic acid.

Want to eat a good snack? How about an organic Pink Lady apple and some organic peanut butter? If you need a bar for convenience, LaraBars  are made with whole food; these are the only ones I buy … and I still rarely eat them. Think real food, not faux food; raise your standards. Be well!


Filed under Real Food Education