Monthly Archives: October 2011

Joel and Daniel Salatin’s Polyface: The Farm of Many Faces

Last month I had the honor of visiting Polyface Farm, in Virginia’s beautiful Shenandoah Valley, for the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund benefactor event. Joel Salatin gave the group a three-hour tour, that was fascinating and inspiring; it really touched my heart to be there.

The video below was recorded a couple of years ago by USA Today. It’s a succinct view of the Salatin philosophy of sustainable, symbiotic farming. I hope you enjoy it!

If you want to learn more about Joel’s philosophy and work, and how you can access nutritious, delicious real food, check out Joel Salatin’s book, “Folks This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People and a Better World,”  just released this week.
Joel Salatin

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Extra! Extra! Read All About It! “Folks, This Ain’t Normal” by Joel Salatin Hits Bookstores Today

Friends, if you read just one blog post from me – ever – will you please let this be the one?

Today’s the day: genius farmer, Joel Salatin’s book, “Folks, This Ain’t Normal,” hits the bookstores! I pre-ordered mine, and received it last week. Watch this one-minute video with Joel, and then read the message below that includes highlights of Joel’s book from Weston A. Price Foundation leader Sally Fallon Morrell

FOLKS THIS AIN”T NORMAL
by Joel Salatin

We live in abnormal times.  Really abnormal times.  Times when most people think Twinkies,  Cocoa-puffs, and Mountain Dew are safe but raw milk, compost grown tomatoes, and Aunt Matilda’s homemade pickles are unsafe.  The average morsel of food travels fifteen hundred miles between point of production and point of consumption.  Indeed, the average T-bone steak sees more of America than the farmer that grew the cow.

Never in the history of civilization has a culture eaten foods it can’t pronounce, foods that can’t be made in a domestic kitchen, or foods that won’t rot.  Living foods mold, rot, and decompose.  How long can an M&M remain on your counter without altering its appearance? 

Until extremely recent days, people had to  think about energy, whether it was providing for draft animals for transportation and power, or accumulating firewood to keep the stove burning in the winter. 

We are the first culture to abdicate domestic culinary arts in favor of microwavable boxes of processed, stabilized, extruded, reconstituted, dye-colored, amalgamated, irradiated, nutrient-compromised, transgenic modified, prostituted pseudo-food.    Modern America now has the highest rate in history of chronic, debilitating diseases, and leads the world in unhealthiness. 

We’re the first culture to invent supermarkets and to universally equate children’s chores with abuse.  We’re the first culture to confine animals in factories, use pharmaceuticals on our food, and break the soil-building carbon cycle on a massive scale. 

These themes, discussed in historical context, conventional modern-day thinking, and future response, position Joel Salatin’s new book FOLKS, THIS AIN’T NORMAL as a must read for Weston A. Price members.  Indeed, he even uses the book to acquaint the world with WAPF as well as the Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund.

“When a major publisher (CenterStreet, an imprint of the Hachette Book Group) decided to put their weight behind this project, I decided that part of my objective would be to let the world know about all these wonderful groups and thinkers who really have all the answers to people’s fears.  I get tired of seeing the media wringing their hands as if solutions don’t exist, when in fact, they do.  I hope this book draws thousands and thousands into the WAPF camp–just mentioning the organization should drive people to the website.”

Never one to allow victimhood excuses, Salatin ends each chapter with a bulleted list of “things you can do.”  This broad book addresses issues as varied as food police, soil development, Disneyfication of the culture, and scientific findings proving pasture-based livestock is far more nutrient dense than factory-farmed counterparts.  It will warm your soul.

If you’ve ever wondered how to articulate how ridiculous many modern assumptions are, this book will give some sound bites.  Filled with stories, satire, and humor, FOLKS, THIS AIN’T NORMAL  was released today in hardback, Kindle, and audio-book.

Joel Salatin, Polyface Farm

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Is Coconut Oil REALLY Healthy? See Dr. Mercola’s Answer

Dr. Joseph Mercola has two kinds of oil in his pantry: olive oil and coconut oil. Watch this video to find out why.

Coconut oil is beneficial for:

  1. thyroid health –  due to its metabolic effect, coconut oil increases the activity of the thyroid and help you lose weight
  2. heart health – lowers cholesterol
  3. and it’s great applied to your skin – as a makeup remover, moisturizer

Of these two oils, Dr. Mercola uses olive oil for salads, and coconut oil for cooking. Why does he use coconut oil for cooking? Because it doesn’t oxidize at high temperatures like live oil can, and industrial oils do. Speaking of industrial oils, avoid these polyunsaturated oils: canola, safflower, soy, sunflower, corn.

What … avoid canola? Yes! Many people think canola oil is good for them, but it’s not. Follow the money, and read this article about the Great Con-ola. If you eat packaged food, read labels carefully; if it says canola on the label, don’t buy it. I recently noticed canola oil on the ingredient list of a popular brand of hummus. Using canola oil in hummus instead of olive oil means the manufacturer’s focus is on cheap, not quality.

Now, back to coconut oil. Look for these qualities in a good coconut oil:

  • Certified organic by USDA standards
  • No refining
  • No chemicals added (including hexane)
  • No bleaching
  • No deodorization
  • No hydrogenation
  • Made from traditional coconut palms only, no hybrid or genetically modified (GMO) varieties
  • Made from fresh coconuts, not the dried “copra” used in cheap oils
  • Made without heat processing

You can buy good quality coconut oil from Dr. Mercola’s site or Wilderness Family Naturals. I bought mine from Green Pasture, but I don’t see it on their website today.

Dr. Mercola will be the keynote speaker at Wise Traditions, the Weston A. Price Foundation’s International Conference in Dallas, November 11 – 13, 2011. I’ll be there!

If you want to learn more about the health benefits of coconut oil, here’s a good article from real food blogger Cheeseslave, and read Bruce Fife’s well-researched book The Coconut Oil Miracle. Be well!

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Out on the Road with Real Food Chef and Holistic Nutrition Educator, Monica Corrado

Chef Monica Corrado articulates exactly how I feel when I’m away from home, looking for a good meal. Check out her story:

out here on the road

Last month I had the pleasure of eating some of Monica’s fermented food. We were at the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund benefactor lunch at Joel Salatin’s Polyface Farm, in the glorious Shenandoah Valley.

Monica made fermented cucumbers and other vegetables, including beets and cauliflower; they were absolutely delicious. I didn’t have the opportunity to meet Monica, but as a casual observer I noticed that she has a wonderful smile and joyful energy.

I absolutely love this blog by Monica, and I hope you do too. Be well.

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